Shorten Your weblink endings- Free and Easy

Shorten Your Web-links – Free and Easy

Summary of Service

Shorten your web page ending (or URLs) to help with your promotions and web postings. You can also shorten long URLs created by others before forwarding the information to share. Long web page endings can easily be cut-off by viewers trying to access the link when copying and pasting into web browsers from emails, online newsletters, etc.
Long URLs can also be a real eye-sore on any “professional” marketing materials.  Originally designed for users of Twitter because of the limited characters allowed per tweet, a couple of the best free URL shortening programs include:
bit.ly
tinyurl
goo.gl (Google’s URL Shortener which can also be an Extension in Chrome)
mcaf.ee (From McAfee – security and anti-virus software makers)
is.gd
notlong
urlcut
urlms

Some of these will offer extra features such as customizing your shortened link name, providing pass-word protection, statistical data on how many views – from which sources referred websites, etc.

Below is an example:
We often utilize a free survey program that provides a weblink but is often too long to include on our Twitter posting and has been accidentally cut-off by intended recipients while access from their phone or copying to a web browser…
Our original link looked similar to the following:
After using bit.ly from the list above:
Copy and place the original long link in the appropriate field and the program does the rest and reproduces a shorter link similar to the following:
Blocking of Shortened URLs:
All is not perfect with using such shortening services as some websites may prevent shortened and/or redirected URLs from being posted. Sometimes is is because the application has its own shortening device such as Twitter when it replaced TinyURL with Bit.ly as its default shortener for users in 2009. Other sites and services may block such shortening services to prevent or reduce SPAM and online viruses as the shortened link may “hide” some of the otherwise noticeable clues that something ‘is a muck’…

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